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Is your organization intelligent?

More than 83% of respondents to a survey by Wipro said their organization is an Intelligent Enterprise or on their way to being one.

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A new study from Wipro shows that Artificial Intelligence (AI), Analytics, Machine Learning, Deep Learning, and Automation are crucial to creating enterprises of the future and that post-COVID, The Intelligent Enterprise will be resilient and able to better manage disruption.  

With 300 respondents in the UK and US — across industry sectors including financial services, healthcare, technology, manufacturing, retail, and consumer goods — the State of Intelligent Enterprises survey revealed that while 80% of organizations recognize the importance of being intelligent, only 17% would classify their organizations as an Intelligent Enterprise.

In the introduction to the survey’s report, Wipro explains that “The Intelligent Enterprise is no longer a futuristic vision. It is a daily imperative.”

“New problems cannot be solved using old methods. The ability – or inability – to make productive decisions now directly depends on an organization’s ability to generate accurate, fast and actionable intelligence to set the correct course.”

One key technology that businesses consider critical is AI. 95% of respondents see AI as critical to Intelligent Enterprises, but only 17% have it deployed across the entire organization.

Additional key findings include:

  • Whether they are already intelligent or working toward it, close to 88% of organizations face challenges.
  • 91% of respondents feel there are data barriers to becoming an Intelligent Enterprise — the most important being data security.
  • 74% of organizations think that investment in technology is the most likely enabler to become an Intelligent Enterprise. 42% of these consider reskilling the workforce as an enabler.

“Organisations now need new capabilities to navigate the current challenges,” says Jayant Prabhu, Vice President & Head of Data, Analytics & AI for Wipro Limited.

“The report amplifies the opportunity to gain a first-mover advantage to being Intelligent. The ability to take productive decisions depends on an organization’s ability to generate accurate, fast and actionable intelligence. Successful organisations are those that quickly adapt to the new technology landscape to transform into an Intelligent Enterprise.”

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23 of 2023’s most gas-guzzling cars

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Some cars cost more to fuel up. Stacker used data from the Department of Energy's fuel economy database to rank the 23 most gas-guzzling cars of 2023.
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Fluctuating gas prices have many feeling pain at the pump—but owners of gas-guzzling cars feel it more acutely.

Stacker used data from the Department of Energy’s fuel economy database to rank the 23 most gas-guzzling cars of 2023. Duplicate models of the same car line were excluded from this analysis: For example, the data includes information on the Rolls-Royce Ghost, Ghost Black Badge, and Ghost Extended, but this analysis only includes information for the base model, Ghost. Only 2023 model cars were considered, and those included here were released between May 2022 and February 2023.

Gas prices rise due to higher demand and higher costs for crude oil and they typically vary by season. In June 2022, the average price for a gallon of gas was over $5 in many states but fell as demand and crude oil prices sank.

New fuel efficiency standards may help your wallet when gas prices rise. In 2022, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration released new standards that require manufacturers to have a fuel efficiency rating of 49 miles per gallon averaged across all of their models by 2026 and for every model by 2029.

Owning a gas guzzler won’t just cost you more at the pump—cars that get less than 22.5 miles per gallon also incur a “gas-guzzler tax,” which starts at $1,000 but climbs to $7,700 for cars that get less than 12.5 mpg. The tax is usually paid by the manufacturer or importer but is no doubt passed on to the customer in the purchase price.

Read on to see which new cars are the least fuel-efficient for 2023.

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The Aston Martin V12 Vantage at Goodwood Festival of Speed 2022 on June 23, 2022, in Chichester, England.

Martyn Lucy // Getty Images

Aston Martin Lagonda Ltd V12 Vantage

– Combined fuel economy: 16 miles per gallon
– Highway fuel economy: 22 mpg
– City fuel economy: 14 mpg
– Manufacturer: Aston Martin
– Engine size: 5.2 liters
– Cylinders: 12
– Transmission: Automatic (A8)

Mercedes-AMG SL 63 4MATIC+ Roadster V8 Biturbo at Brussels Expo on January 13, 2023, in Brussels, Belgium.

Sjoerd van der Wal // Getty Images

Mercedes-Benz AMG SL 63 4MATIC+

– Combined fuel economy: 16 miles per gallon
– Highway fuel economy: 22 mpg
– City fuel economy: 14 mpg
– Manufacturer: Mercedes-Benz
– Engine size: 4 liters
– Cylinders: 8
– Transmission: Automatic (A9)

The Audi R8 at the Sharnbrook Hotel in Bedfordshire.

Martyn Lucy // Getty Images

Audi R8 Coupe quattro

– Combined fuel economy: 15 miles per gallon
– Highway fuel economy: 18 mpg
– City fuel economy: 13 mpg
– Manufacturer: Volkswagen
– Engine size: 5.2 liters
– Cylinders: 10
– Transmission: Automated Manual – Selectable (e.g., Automated Manual with paddles) (AM-S7)

An Audi R8 Spyder V10 quattro supercar in Milton Keynes, Bucks, United Kingdom.

Sue Thatcher // Shutterstock

Audi R8 Spyder quattro

– Combined fuel economy: 15 miles per gallon
– Highway fuel economy: 18 mpg
– City fuel economy: 13 mpg
– Manufacturer: Volkswagen
– Engine size: 5.2 liters
– Cylinders: 10
– Transmission: Automated Manual – Selectable (e.g., Automated Manual with paddles) (AM-S7)

A 2017 Lamborghini Huracan Coupe at the 109th Annual Chicago Auto Show at McCormick Place in Chicago, Illinois, USA, on February 12, 2017.

Anadolu Agency // Getty Images

Lamborghini Huracan Coupe

– Combined fuel economy: 15 miles per gallon
– Highway fuel economy: 18 mpg
– City fuel economy: 13 mpg
– Manufacturer: Volkswagen
– Engine size: 5.2 liters
– Cylinders: 10
– Transmission: Automated Manual – Selectable (e.g., Automated Manual with paddles) (AM-S7)

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The Lamborghini Huracan Evo Spyder in Knightsbridge, London.

Martyn Lucy // Getty Images

Lamborghini Huracan Spyder

– Combined fuel economy: 15 miles per gallon
– Highway fuel economy: 18 mpg
– City fuel economy: 13 mpg
– Manufacturer: Volkswagen
– Engine size: 5.2 liters
– Cylinders: 10
– Transmission: Automated Manual – Selectable (e.g., Automated Manual with paddles) (AM-S7)

A Bentley Flying Spur driving on a road in Romania.

GabrielPreda.ro // Shutterstock

Bentley Flying Spur

– Combined fuel economy: 15 miles per gallon
– Highway fuel economy: 19 mpg
– City fuel economy: 12 mpg
– Manufacturer: Volkswagen
– Engine size: 6 liters
– Cylinders: 12
– Transmission: Automated Manual – Selectable (e.g., Automated Manual with paddles) (AM-S8)

Chairman and Chief Executive of Bentley Motors Wolfgang Duerheimer presenting the Bentley Continental GT Speed model car during a preview of German carmaker Volkwagen Group on March 2, 2015.

FABRICE COFFRINI // Getty Images

Bentley Continental GT Speed

– Combined fuel economy: 15 miles per gallon
– Highway fuel economy: 20 mpg
– City fuel economy: 12 mpg
– Manufacturer: Volkswagen
– Engine size: 6 liters
– Cylinders: 12
– Transmission: Automated Manual – Selectable (e.g., Automated Manual with paddles) (AM-S8)

A blue Chevrolet Corvette Z06 SUPER CHARGE P sports car parked in a garage.

Shang Saal // Shutterstock

Chevrolet Corvette Z06

– Combined fuel economy: 15 miles per gallon
– Highway fuel economy: 21 mpg
– City fuel economy: 12 mpg
– Manufacturer: General Motors
– Engine size: 5.5 liters
– Cylinders: 8
– Transmission: Semi-Automatic (S8)

A Dodge Charger SRT Hellcat Widebody on display at the 112th Annual Chicago Auto Show at McCormick Place in Chicago, Illinois, on February 6, 2020.

Raymond Boyd // Getty Images

Dodge Charger SRT Widebody

– Combined fuel economy: 15 miles per gallon
– Highway fuel economy: 21 mpg
– City fuel economy: 12 mpg
– Manufacturer: FCA US LLC (Chrysler)
– Engine size: 6.2 liters
– Cylinders: 8
– Transmission: Automatic (A8)

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The 2020 Cadillac CT5-V on display at the Houston Auto Show.

Floopin Photography // Shutterstock

Cadillac CT5 V

– Combined fuel economy: 15 miles per gallon
– Highway fuel economy: 21 mpg
– City fuel economy: 13 mpg
– Manufacturer: General Motors
– Engine size: 6.2 liters
– Cylinders: 8
– Transmission: Manual (M6)

A red Dodge Challenger SRT Widebody standing on a secluded road by a field and forest.

JDzacovsky // Shutterstock

Dodge Challenger SRT Widebody

– Combined fuel economy: 15 miles per gallon
– Highway fuel economy: 21 mpg
– City fuel economy: 13 mpg
– Manufacturer: FCA US LLC (Chrysler)
– Engine size: 6.2 liters
– Cylinders: 8
– Transmission: Automatic (A8)

The Ferrari 812 Compitizione seen at Goodwood Festival of Speed 2022 on June 23, 2022, in Chichester, England.

Martyn Lucy // Getty Images

Ferrari North America Inc. 812 Competizione

– Combined fuel economy: 14 miles per gallon
– Highway fuel economy: 16 mpg
– City fuel economy: 12 mpg
– Manufacturer: Ferrari
– Engine size: 6.5 liters
– Cylinders: 12
– Transmission: Automated Manual (AM7)

A 2016 Bentley Continental GT Speed Convertible at the 108th Annual Chicago Auto Show at McCormick Place in Chicago, Illinois, on February 12, 2016.

Raymond Boyd // Getty Images

Bentley Continental GT Convertible Speed

– Combined fuel economy: 14 miles per gallon
– Highway fuel economy: 18 mpg
– City fuel economy: 12 mpg
– Manufacturer: Volkswagen
– Engine size: 6 liters
– Cylinders: 12
– Transmission: Automated Manual – Selectable (e.g., Automated Manual with paddles) (AM-S8)

The Rolls-Royce Phantom unveiled at the company's manufacturing plant and head office at Goodwood in West Sussex, UK.

Tim Ockenden – PA Images // Getty Images

Rolls-Royce Motor Cars Limited Phantom

– Combined fuel economy: 14 miles per gallon
– Highway fuel economy: 18 mpg
– City fuel economy: 12 mpg
– Manufacturer: Rolls-Royce
– Engine size: 6.7 liters
– Cylinders: 12
– Transmission: Semi-Automatic (S8)

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A white Chevrolet Corvette C06 Z06 Carbon 65 at AutoZürich car show.

Kaukola Photography // Shutterstock

Chevrolet Corvette Z06 Carbon Aero

– Combined fuel economy: 14 miles per gallon
– Highway fuel economy: 19 mpg
– City fuel economy: 12 mpg
– Manufacturer: General Motors
– Engine size: 5.5 liters
– Cylinders: 8
– Transmission: Semi-Automatic (S8)

A Rolls-Royce Ghost in a hotel parking lot.

Tricky_Shark // Shutterstock

Rolls-Royce Motor Cars Limited Ghost

– Combined fuel economy: 14 miles per gallon
– Highway fuel economy: 19 mpg
– City fuel economy: 12 mpg
– Manufacturer: Rolls-Royce
– Engine size: 6.7 liters
– Cylinders: 12
– Transmission: Semi-Automatic (S8)

A Rolls-Royce Cullinan in a desert in Dubai.

Camerasandcoffee // Shutterstock

Rolls-Royce Motor Cars Limited Cullinan

– Combined fuel economy: 14 miles per gallon
– Highway fuel economy: 19 mpg
– City fuel economy: 12 mpg
– Manufacturer: Rolls-Royce
– Engine size: 6.7 liters
– Cylinders: 12
– Transmission: Semi-Automatic (S8)

A Mercedes-Maybach S680 luxury sedan on display at Brussels Expo on January 13, 2023, in Brussels, Belgium.

Sjoerd van der Wal // Getty Images

Mercedes-Benz Maybach S 680 4Matic

– Combined fuel economy: 14 miles per gallon
– Highway fuel economy: 20 mpg
– City fuel economy: 12 mpg
– Manufacturer: Mercedes-Benz
– Engine size: 6 liters
– Cylinders: 12
– Transmission: Automatic (A9)

A Ferrari 812 GTS driving down a road in Italy during a parade.

Mau47 // Shutterstock

Ferrari North America Inc. 812 GTS

– Combined fuel economy: 13 miles per gallon
– Highway fuel economy: 15 mpg
– City fuel economy: 12 mpg
– Manufacturer: Ferrari
– Engine size: 6.5 liters
– Cylinders: 12
– Transmission: Automated Manual (AM7)

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A 2022 Ferrari Monza SP1 during the Concours of Elegance at Hampton Court Palace on September 2, 2022, in London, England.

John Keeble // Getty Images

Ferrari North America Inc. Ferrari Monza SP1

– Combined fuel economy: 13 miles per gallon
– Highway fuel economy: 15 mpg
– City fuel economy: 12 mpg
– Manufacturer: Ferrari
– Engine size: 6.5 liters
– Cylinders: 12
– Transmission: Automated Manual (AM7)

The Ferrari Daytona SP3 at Goodwood Festival of Speed 2022 on June 23, 2022, in Chichester, England.

Martyn Lucy // Getty Images

Ferrari North America Inc. Ferrari Daytona SP3

– Combined fuel economy: 13 miles per gallon
– Highway fuel economy: 16 mpg
– City fuel economy: 12 mpg
– Manufacturer: Ferrari
– Engine size: 6.5 liters
– Cylinders: 12
– Transmission: Automated Manual (AM7)

A Bugatti Chiron Sport at Brussels Motor Show in 2020.

Grzegorz Czapski // Shutterstock

Bugatti Chiron

– Combined fuel economy: 11 miles per gallon
– Highway fuel economy: 14 mpg
– City fuel economy: 9 mpg
– Manufacturer: Volkswagen
– Engine size: 8 liters
– Cylinders: 16
– Transmission: Automated Manual – Selectable (e.g., Automated Manual with paddles) (AM-S7)

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What questions should companies ask before going all-in on AI?

Problem-solving, data sets, and the consequences of getting it wrong.

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From chatbots that answer our questions to emails that write themselves, AI is increasingly present in our lives — and the advent of startlingly sophisticated and headline-making tools like ChatGPT suggest that presence is likely to grow.

As it stands, the technologies are advancing at a seemingly breakneck pace, impacting sectors as diverse as public health and transportation. Given the spread, it’s easy to assume AI could be used by just about any company — and there are plenty of adoptees. 

The 2022 McKinsey Global Survey on AI reported in December that although it has stabilized in recent years, the proportion of organizations adopting AI in at least one business area has more than doubled since 2017.

Furthermore, “the average number of AI capabilities that organizations use has also doubled — from 1.9 in 2018 to 3.8 in 2022,” the report found.

But what are companies actually using AI for? And, what are some critical questions experts say companies should ask themselves before going all-in?

Let’s take a closer look.

Why AI is becoming increasingly useful

One reason AI is becoming especially useful is because by definition, it is the ability of machines to learn and make decisions based on data and analytics. And it should come as no surprise that companies now have access to more data than ever before. 

How much more? Well, Gil Press — a senior contributor with Forbes — reported toward the end of 2020 that in the 10 years that came before, “the amount of data created, captured, copied, and consumed in the world increased from 1.2 trillion gigabytes to 59 trillion gigabytes.”

That’s almost 5,000 per cent growth, Press said.

And with the help of emerging technologies like AI, the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton Online explained, companies are now able to capture user data that can help them make informed business decisions.

“AI is no longer an experimental technology only used by select brands,” it said. “For many companies around the world, it has become a core part of their operations.”

AI: What is it used for?

So, how is AI being used by companies and organizations?

Common applications cited by Business News Daily include the detection of cyberattacks and threats, digital personal assistants that manage calendars, and customer service chatbots.

The latter is also where some companies are using ChatGPT. Bloomberg reported on March 1 that the technology has already found a home on apps for Instacart, where customers will be able to ask it questions about recipes; Shopify, where it will offer suggestions; and Quizlet Inc., where it will provide users with a “tutoring experience.”

In more specialized fields like healthcare, AI’s uses include helping to make potentially life-saving cancer diagnoses. The New York Times reported on March 5 that AI known as “computer-assisted detection” is helping to detect breast cancer missed by mammograms.

More generally, some popular uses for AI include service operations optimization, contact centre automation, customer service analytics, sales and demand forecasting, and risk modeling and analytics, according to the 2022 McKinsey Global Survey on AI.

And when it comes to deciding how to apply AI, Wharton Online reported that companies often focus on driving growth. 

That growth, according to Entrepreneur’s Auria Moore, is focused on three central areas: 

  • AI-powered analytics, which can allow businesses to gather information about users for better product creation.
  • Customer service satisfaction, where AI chatbots can provide answers to users faster.
  • Targeted digital marketing campaigns, which has AI granting marketers the ability to “enhance personalization at an individual level.”

Meanwhile, supply-chain management is where the highest-reported cost benefits from AI were identified in the McKinsey survey — while “the biggest reported revenue effects are found in marketing and sales, product and service development, and strategy and corporate finance.”

“The bottom-line value realized from AI remains strong and largely consistent,” the report said.

“About a quarter of respondents report this year that at least 5 percent of their organizations’ [earnings before interest and taxes] was attributable to AI in 2021, in line with findings from the previous two years.”

What to consider before going all-in

Given its vast possibilities for application and seemingly limitless potential, investing in AI could seem like a no-brainer for businesses. But some experts warn that it shouldn’t be.

“The first question to ask yourself when considering AI is what problems might be solved with the technology,” Inc.’s Ben Sherry reported last May.

While some companies would find AI genuinely useful — for example, Sherry said, an e-commerce company could use it to market specific products to customers based on data — others could wind up with an unnecessary expense.

“Ask yourself if automating part of your business has an easily identifiable benefit, or whether you have routine tasks that could easily be automated,” he suggested.

AI’s algorithms also need a lot of high-quality data to deliver valuable insights, Open Data Science (ODSC) explained in November 2021, and machine learning needs varied data to build its intelligence.

So before investing in AI, ODSC said, it’s critical to make sure your company has access to a sufficient amount of high-quality data sets.

“Without data and specifically, high-quality data, your AI investment is useless,” ODSC said. 

“It’s essentially like purchasing an expensive car with an incredibly powerful motor without any access to a fuel source.”

Finally, some experts say a critically important question for companies considering AI to ask themselves is: what are the consequences if it fails?

“AI models work through very sophisticated algorithms and statistical correlations, but there is always a margin of error. Does the company want to implement AI in a process with high variability and a low accuracy rate, or the opposite? What risks and how much investment would be lost if it didn’t work out?” industrial IoT company Nexus Integra asked in a blog post.

“Depending on which systems and data are available, the company must evaluate whether the accuracy of these models is expected to be high enough to proceed.”

And Ricardo Baeza-Yates, director of research at the Institute for Experiential AI at Northeastern University, wrote in an August 2021 piece for Forbes that “as the usage of AI grows exponentially, so have the number of AI incidents.

As such, Baeza-Yates said companies looking to use AI should first ask themselves if they have deeply considered the direct, and indirect, impact of their product or service.

“Here, the accuracy of your model is irrelevant. What matters is the impact of the mistakes you make, even if they are few,” he wrote.“In cases where people were falsely accused by facial recognition systems, killed by driverless cars or unethically targeted for fraud, the damage was severe and lasting.”

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States with the most adults of retirement age still working

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Stacker used 2021 data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics and the Census Bureau to find what share of each state's 65-and-over set still has a job.  
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For many Americans, the typical life plan has long been school, work, retirement at 65, and living comfortably. But not as many people are traveling that path anymore.

Nearly 19% of people of retirement age—65 years or older—remain in the workforce. In fact, Americans over 55 are the only age group that increased its labor force participation rate from 2001 to 2021. Projections expect that trend to continue into the next decade.

Many simply don’t want to retire because they enjoy what they do and don’t want to slow down. Some find that retirement doesn’t suit them and return to work to add meaning to their lives.

Others work because they can’t afford retirement. According to the Economic Policy Institute, roughly one-third of workers aged 55 to 64 don’t have access to a retirement savings plan. Those who rely solely on Social Security benefits may find they don’t cover all of their living expenses. Major unplanned expenses like medical bills can also keep people in the workforce.

Stacker used 2021 data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics and the Census Bureau to find what share of each state’s retirement-age population, those 65 and older, still participate in the labor force. Labor force statistics are calculated based on the civilian noninstitutional population, meaning those adults who are not incarcerated or in long-term medical facilities. It’s helpful to note that age 65 is the typical age for retirement, as it’s the age to qualify for Medicare.

Continue reading to find out whether your state has the most adults of retirement age still at work.

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Downtown Charleston street view.

Susanne Pommer // Shutterstock

#51. South Carolina

– Labor force participation among ages 65+: 14% (142,000 people)
– Population ages 65+: 18.6% (967,223 people)

Charleston skyline on the Kanawha River.

Sean Pavone // Shutterstock

#50. West Virginia

– Labor force participation among ages 65+: 14.8% (56,000 people)
– Population ages 65+: 20.7% (368,775 people)

Biloxi Lighthouse on a clear day.

Sean Pavone // Shutterstock

#49. Mississippi

– Labor force participation among ages 65+: 14.9% (73,000 people)
– Population ages 65+: 16.8% (496,945 people)

Tempe lake and downtown.

Tim Roberts Photography // Shutterstock

#48. Arizona

– Labor force participation among ages 65+: 15.1% (195,000 people)
– Population ages 65+: 18.3% (1.33 million people)

Birmingham skyline at dusk.

Sean Pavone // Shutterstock

#47. Alabama

– Labor force participation among ages 65+: 15.8% (137,000 people)
– Population ages 65+: 17.6% (885,809 people)

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Downtown Nashville in autumn.

Brian Wilson Photography // Shutterstock

#46. Tennessee

– Labor force participation among ages 65+: 16% (194,000 people)
– Population ages 65+: 17.0% (1.19 million people)

Downtown Louisville buildings and bridge.

f11photo // Shutterstock

#45. Kentucky

– Labor force participation among ages 65+: 16.1% (123,000 people)
– Population ages 65+: 17.0% (768,416 people)

Albuquerque residential suburbs.

turtix // Shutterstock

#44. New Mexico

– Labor force participation among ages 65+: 16.3% (65,000 people)
– Population ages 65+: 18.5% (391,797 people)

Little Rock skyline in afternoon.

Eduardo Medrano // Shutterstock

#43. Arkansas

– Labor force participation among ages 65+: 16.6% (91,000 people)
– Population ages 65+: 17.4% (525,153 people)

Seafront beach promenade in Fort Lauderdale.

mariakray // Shutterstock

#42. Florida

– Labor force participation among ages 65+: 16.7% (744,000 people)
– Population ages 65+: 21.1% (4.60 million people)

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Aerial view with early morning light in downtown Wilmington.

Real Window Creative // Shutterstock

#41. Delaware

– Labor force participation among ages 65+: 17.1% (35,000 people)
– Population ages 65+: 20.1% (201,551 people)

Pedestrians walking in downtown Ann Arbor.

Paul Brady Photography // Shutterstock

#39. Michigan (tie)

– Labor force participation among ages 65+: 17.2% (319,000 people)
– Population ages 65+: 18.1% (1.82 million people)

Cincinnati downtown skyline and bridge.

photo.ua // Shutterstock

#39. Ohio (tie)

– Labor force participation among ages 65+: 17.2% (373,000 people)
– Population ages 65+: 17.8% (2.10 million people)

Aerial view of Atlanta metro and highways.

Brett Barnhill // Shutterstock

#37. Georgia (tie)

– Labor force participation among ages 65+: 17.4% (279,000 people)
– Population ages 65+: 14.7% (1.59 million people)

Skyline of downtown Boise.

Charles Knowles // Shutterstock

#37. Idaho (tie)

– Labor force participation among ages 65+: 17.4% (56,000 people)
– Population ages 65+: 16.5% (314,010 people)

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Elevated view of Seattle Space Needle and downtown.

kan_khampanya // Shutterstock

#35. Washington (tie)

– Labor force participation among ages 65+: 17.8% (213,000 people)
– Population ages 65+: 16.2% (1.25 million people)

Chicago neighborhood buildings and city skyline on sunny autumn day.

marchello74 // Shutterstock

#35. Illinois (tie)

– Labor force participation among ages 65+: 17.8% (373,000 people)
– Population ages 65+: 16.6% (2.10 million people)

Portland cityscape from Pittock Mansion.

Josemaria Toscano // Shutterstock

#34. Oregon

– Labor force participation among ages 65+: 18% (148,000 people)
– Population ages 65+: 18.6% (789,896 people)

Pittsburg cityscape over the Allegheny River.

ESB Professional // Shutterstock

#33. Pennsylvania

– Labor force participation among ages 65+: 18.3% (466,000 people)
– Population ages 65+: 19.0% (2.46 million people)

Aerial view of The Gateway Arch and riverfront in downtown St. Louis.

Joe Hendrickson // Shutterstock

#32. Missouri

– Labor force participation among ages 65+: 18.6% (203,000 people)
– Population ages 65+: 17.6% (1.08 million people)

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Crowds of people walk across 3rd Avenue in Manhattan.

Ryan DeBerardinis // Shutterstock

#31. New York

– Labor force participation among ages 65+: 18.9% (669,000 people)
– Population ages 65+: 17.5% (3.48 million people)

Asheville skyline in the fall.

Derek Olson Photography // Shutterstock

#30. North Carolina

– Labor force participation among ages 65+: 19.1% (367,000 people)
– Population ages 65+: 17.0% (1.80 million people)

Canal Street streetcar in downtown New Orleans.

TFoxFoto // Shutterstock

#29. Louisiana

– Labor force participation among ages 65+: 19.3% (147,000 people)
– Population ages 65+: 16.6% (766,330 people)

Indianapolis skyline seen from canal walkway.

KYPhua // Shutterstock

#27. Indiana (tie)

– Labor force participation among ages 65+: 19.5% (219,000 people)
– Population ages 65+: 16.4% (1.12 million people)

Aerial view of the Bay Bridge in San Francisco.

TierneyMJ // Shutterstock

#27. California (tie)

– Labor force participation among ages 65+: 19.5% (1.18 million people)
– Population ages 65+: 15.2% (5.96 million people)

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People walk along the oceanfront boardwalk and resort area in Virginia Beach.

Sherry V Smith // Shutterstock

#26. Virginia

– Labor force participation among ages 65+: 19.6% (277,000 people)
– Population ages 65+: 16.3% (1.41 million people)

Oklahoma City downtown skyline in the late afternoon.

Sean Pavone // Shutterstock

#25. Oklahoma

– Labor force participation among ages 65+: 19.7% (126,000 people)
– Population ages 65+: 16.2% (645,174 people)

Aerial view of Austin skyline.

Canva

#24. Texas

– Labor force participation among ages 65+: 19.9% (788,000 people)
– Population ages 65+: 13.2% (3.89 million people)

Milwaukee cityscape with Art Museum with the Northwestern Mutual building.

Tony Savino // Shutterstock

#21. Wisconsin (tie)

– Labor force participation among ages 65+: 20.1% (205,000 people)
– Population ages 65+: 17.9% (1.05 million people)

Portland Head Lighthouse and coastline.

Joseph Sohm // Shutterstock

#21. Maine (tie)

– Labor force participation among ages 65+: 20.1% (63,000 people)
– Population ages 65+: 21.7% (297,101 people)

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Aerial view of Carson City skyline and capitol building.

Jacob Boomsma // Shutterstock

#21. Nevada (tie)

– Labor force participation among ages 65+: 20.1% (114,000 people)
– Population ages 65+: 16.5% (519,568 people)

Salt Lake City downtown street.

Canva

#20. Utah

– Labor force participation among ages 65+: 20.9% (79,000 people)
– Population ages 65+: 11.6% (388,120 people)

Elevated view of Grand Junction and the Colorado River.

Paul Gana // Shutterstock

#18. Colorado (tie)

– Labor force participation among ages 65+: 21% (182,000 people)
– Population ages 65+: 15.1% (880,167 people)

Aerial view of Jersey CIty at sunset.

f11photo // Shutterstock

#18. New Jersey (tie)

– Labor force participation among ages 65+: 21% (341,000 people)
– Population ages 65+: 16.9% (1.56 million people)

View of Missoula from Mount Sentinel.

Jon Bilous // Shutterstock

#17. Montana

– Labor force participation among ages 65+: 21.1% (49,000 people)
– Population ages 65+: 19.7% (217,298 people)

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Aerial view of Market Square and North Church in Portsmouth.

Wangkun Jia // Shutterstock

#16. New Hampshire

– Labor force participation among ages 65+: 22% (65,000 people)
– Population ages 65+: 19.3% (267,741 people)

Honolulu waterfront and cityscape.

MNStudio // Shutterstock

#13. Hawaii (tie)

– Labor force participation among ages 65+: 22.1% (62,000 people)
– Population ages 65+: 19.6% (282,567 people)

City of Jackson Hole and surrounding landscape.

C Model // Shutterstock

#13. Wyoming (tie)

– Labor force participation among ages 65+: 22.1% (23,000 people)
– Population ages 65+: 17.9% (103,822 people)

Cape Cod seashore viewed from Pilgrim Monument.

Wangkun Jia // Shutterstock

#13. Massachusetts (tie)

– Labor force participation among ages 65+: 22.1% (271,000 people)
– Population ages 65+: 17.4% (1.22 million people)

Aerial view of Grand Forks.

Jacob Boomsma // Shutterstock

#12. North Dakota

– Labor force participation among ages 65+: 22.7% (29,000 people)
– Population ages 65+: 16.0% (123,840 people)

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The Manchester Street Power Station smokestacks and Providence skyline.

Big Joe // Shutterstock

#11. Rhode Island

– Labor force participation among ages 65+: 22.9% (48,000 people)
– Population ages 65+: 18.3% (200,201 people)

Des Moines cityscape and sculpture park.

Grindstone Media Group // Shutterstock

#10. Iowa

– Labor force participation among ages 65+: 23.3% (130,000 people)
– Population ages 65+: 17.8% (567,581 people)

Aerial view of Annapolis and Statehouse.

Real Window Creative // Shutterstock

#9. Maryland

– Labor force participation among ages 65+: 23.4% (234,000 people)
– Population ages 65+: 16.3% (1.00 million people)

Downtown Minneapolis overlooking Mississippi River

ostreetphotography // Shutterstock

#7. Minnesota (tie)

– Labor force participation among ages 65+: 23.5% (215,000 people)
– Population ages 65+: 16.8% (959,272 people)

Pennsylvania Avenue and US Capitol.

Orhan Cam // Shutterstock

#7. Washington D.C. (tie)

– Labor force participation among ages 65+: 23.5% (20,000 people)
– Population ages 65+: 12.8% (85,615 people)

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River and Keeper of the Plains statue near downtown Wichita.

Sean Pavone // Shutterstock

#6. Kansas

– Labor force participation among ages 65+: 23.8% (116,000 people)
– Population ages 65+: 16.7% (489,676 people)

Skyline of downtown Hartford from above Charter Oak Landing.

Sean Pavone // Shutterstock

#5. Connecticut

– Labor force participation among ages 65+: 24.3% (164,000 people)
– Population ages 65+: 18.0% (649,172 people)

Mount Juneau and the city of Juneau.

Mary Swift // Shutterstock

#4. Alaska

– Labor force participation among ages 65+: 24.7% (24,000 people)
– Population ages 65+: 13.4% (98,410 people)

Aerial view of Lincoln in autumn.

Jacob Boomsma // Shutterstock

#2. Nebraska (tie)

– Labor force participation among ages 65+: 25% (77,000 people)
– Population ages 65+: 16.4% (322,833 people)

Montpelier city skyline.

haveseen // Shutterstock

#2. Vermont (tie)

– Labor force participation among ages 65+: 25% (36,000 people)
– Population ages 65+: 20.6% (133,173 people)

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Tourists visit Falls Park in Sioux Falls.

Steven Frame // Shutterstock

#1. South Dakota

– Labor force participation among ages 65+: 26.7% (Estimated 42,000)
– Population ages 65+: 17.6% (157,883 people)

Note: Labor force participation data for South Dakota seniors was not available from BLS, so Stacker used data from a South Dakota Department of Labor report. Stacker estimated the state’s 65+ labor force based on available Census Bureau data. Since the data comes from two sources, there may be some discrepancies in actual values and comparisons.

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